tablets

Amazon Kindle DX Tablet Review

The Amazon Kindle DX is the follow-up to the successful Kindle Wireless, with a much larger screen.

May 13, 2011
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Device & Specs

This comparison serves largely to distinguish features of the Kindle lineup by examining the DX and the Wireless. While the two Amazon eReaders share many things in common, there are some small differences that we feel we should point out to you before you pick one over the other.

Screen

Probably the most glaring difference between the two eReaders is sheer screen size. While the Kindle wireless has a more or less standard screen size of 6 inches, the absolutely monster DX has a 9.7 inch screen that will not be hard to lose. Both eReaders have very similar eInk displays, and consequently they both have very similar performances in terms of blacks and whites, no color display and similar resolution.

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Battery

Because both eReaders have similar screen technology that doesn't draw much power, they each have excellent battery life, lasting well over 24 hours of continuous use, may it be audio or eBook. You can't go wrong with either one here.

eReader

Each Kindle offers a very similar eReader experience, with similar controls, interface and display. They share the same eBook store, and each is compatible with different formats that can be transferred via an included USB cable. They even both share the same "dip to black" effect when turning pages, though this seems to be fairly universal for eInk screens. Both models here provide a good eReader experience.

Internet

Though the internet browser in each is under the "experimental" section, the Kindle Wireless actually does a bit better here, as it converts websites to greyscale, while the DX converts them to plain text. Still, you're probably not going to have the patience to use either as a web browser, as the kindle really isn't a good platform for that sort of thing.

The eBook and app store for the Kindle has a huge selection of content, and shouldn't leave you wanting. If, however, this is not the case, you can always convert files from other vendors using Calibre or Amazon's conversion service online.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Email & Web Browsing
  8. Amazon Kindle Keyboard Wi-Fi Comparison
  9. Barnes & Noble Nook Wi-Fi Comparison
  10. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  11. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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