tablets

Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet Review

Middle of the road performance, but at a jaw-droppingly low price.

November 14, 2011
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Email

Here is easily the most frustrating part of owning a Amazon Kindle Fire: email support. If you have an older email address from a service that is run on the POP or IMAP frameworks, you should be able to integrate your mailboxes using the email app installed on the device, but we still haven't gotten it to work at our labs. In addition, there is no standalone Gmail app as of yet, but don't worry: it works famously in the browser.

Web Browsing

One of the biggest innovations marketed by Amazon at the Kindle Fire's announcement party was the browser: Silk. Employing a system of cloud data processing that makes browsing theoretically faster for tablet users, Silk does impressive things for a browser on a tablet, as you will not notice much. But that's the beauty of it: there aren't as many page crashes or long wait times as you'd get on tablets with comparable hardware like the Dell Streak 7. By virtue of the fact that most people will never notice huge issues with their browser, Silk is impressive in its own right.

Web Browsing Image
The much-hyped Silk browser.

Much like other web browsers on Android-based systems, the Amazon Kindle Fire 's browser allows you to make full use of multiple tabs, bookmarks, and searching options built right into the browser itself. Though it's nothing special to look at, you'll hardly notice the clunky toolbar at the top of the screen. All in all a very normal-looking browser.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Movies & Video
  8. Email & Web Browsing
  9. Internet Apps
  10. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  11. Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Comparison
  12. Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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