tablets

Asus Transformer Prime Tablet Review

The newest Asus tablet provides some very impressive performance for its price point.

March 01, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Controls

Because the Asus Transformer Prime TF-201's physical controls are limited on the tablet itself, most of your interaction with the tablet occurs through the extremely responsive capacitive touch screen. Ice Cream Sandwich has a few more quirks than Honeycomb, so you should take a while to get used to the new methods of accessing different apps and settings. Though the layout and control list is very similar to Honeycomb, there are a couple differences in where things are located, so take some time to figure out your way around the tablet.

If you elect to buy the keyboard accessory to make your Transformer Prime an even bigger powerhouse, you'll not only get more physical keys than just the volume buttons and an on/off button, but also a keyboard (duh) and a touchpad to control your Transformer Prime more like a laptop.

Connectivity

The big draw to the Asus Transformer Prime TF-201 is the fact that it offers so much in terms of connectivity. To start, the tablet itself has a microSD card slot, as well as bluetooth 2.1+EDR, 802.11n wireless, a micro HDMI port, and the ability to expand these capabilities with the keyboard accessory designed for the Transformer Prime. This accessory not only offers expanded battery life, but USB ports and other options. This is a true media maven.

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Battery Life

While the battery life results for the Asus Transformer Prime TF-201 varying wildly, it's tempting to think that either there's something wrong with the tablet, or our testing methods, but after repeated tests, we can assure you that neither is the case. Rather, it's a hardware issue. This is the first quad-core processor in a tablet that we've run across, and because the screen is also incredibly bright, you have two elements that are capable of drawing an enormous amount of power for a portable device.

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Because each element has such a hugely variable amount of power draw for certain tasks, battery life will swing from really good when the process uses only a couple cores, or if the screen doesn't need to be bright. Reading eBooks, for example, draws a lot of power because it takes a lot more juice to display a lot of bright white area on the screen at 600+cd/m2, which is why the eReader battery life is so preposterously low.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Movies & Video
  8. Email & Web Browsing
  9. Internet Apps
  10. Asus Eee Pad Transformer Comparison
  11. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  12. Motorola Xyboard Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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