tablets

Barnes & Noble Nook HD Tablet Review

If you're a fan of apps, widgets, streaming content, or games, this is a tablet to skip.

December 07, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Controls

As the Barnes & Noble Nook HD has a capacitive touchscreen and few if any buttons, virtually all of your interaction happens through the screen. Controlling the Barnes & Noble Nook HD isn't difficult, but it isn't all that easy, either. For example, depending on the app you use, you are forced to move the screen as it switches to a different orientation than how you're holding it. Additionally, the layouts aren't all that intuitive, and there's very little you can do to customize your experience.

Much of this has to do with the fact that the Nook HD's operating system, like that of the Kindle Fire HDs, is basically a re-skin of an older Android build, but with all the goodies of that OS ripped out, and replaced by what the manufacturer wants. In this case, Barnes and Noble gutted it.

Connectivity

As far as connectivity options go, the specs on the Barnes & Noble Nook HD aren't all that impressive, though there are a bunch of people out there who will like the expandable memory capability afforded by the microSD card slot. If you buy the cable through Barnes & Noble, you can get HDMI out, but we were unable to test this at the lab in time for publish. Aside from that the standard 802.11n wireless card in the device, there are no other wireless standards, so what you see here is what you get.

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Battery Life

Hardly a check in the negative column, the Barnes & Noble Nook HD has somewhat above average battery life, just enough to last for a short intra-continental flight or commute. With all additional processes disabled and the backlight cranked to 11, we were able to wring out 6 hours and 24 minutes reading an eBook, and 6 hours, 43 minutes watching some of the most horrible acting ever.

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Considering the fact that the Barnes & Noble Nook HD really doesn't have much in the way of apps to rip down your battery's charge, there's not going to be a ton of things besides leaving the wireless going or adjusting the screen brightness that will alter your battery life. Still, your experience may vary from ours depending on a slew of factors, so our results are more of a ballpark than hard limit.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Email & Web Browsing
  8. Internet Apps
  9. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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