tablets

Barnes and Noble Nook Touch Edition eReader Review

Overall, the Barnes and Noble Nook Touch Edition eReader does one thing and does it exceptionally well.

June 21, 2011
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Device & Specs

Both devices are well-equipped to deal with the task at hand when it comes to reading eBooks, but each has their advantages over the other: the Kindle can browse the internet and is connected to the web wherever you go via an agreement with AT&T for free 3G. On the other hand, the Nook Touch has increased processing power and a touchscreen. The only drawback to the Nook Touch is that it does not have the QWERTY keyboard that the Kindle does, which can make searching for books a pain.

Screen

Both screens are virtually identical in every regard; they are similarly reflective, they have roughly the same DPI (give or take a pixel or two) and they are the same size. Where the Nook Touch holds an advantage is its touchscreen, which makes for a great user interface.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Battery

Both the Kindle and the Nook Touch have outstanding battery life, but the Kindle will last 11 days where the Nook Touch will last 10 days of continuous eBook reading. Splitting hairs, we know, but it's still worth knowing what has the better battery.

eReader

Both the Kindle and the Nook Touch offer a great experience reading eBooks, as they are very similar units. However, the touchscreen of the Nook Touch allows for a more natural eBook reading experience with its gestures and increased processing speed minimizes the annoying screen inversion every time you turn a page.

Internet

It's hard to compare the Nook Touch's internet features against the Kindle's because, well, it has none! Outside of its eBook store, you can't browse the internet like the Kindle (however rudimentary and primitive it may be), you can't check email (again in the primitive browser), and you can't download even the hilariously basic apps available to Kindle owners. Still, if you read the review of the Kindle, you'll know that this really isn't much of a plus at all.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Amazon Kindle Keyboard Wi-Fi Comparison
  7. Barnes & Noble Nook Color Comparison
  8. Kobo eReader Wireless Comparison
  9. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Compare Prices
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

What's Your Take?

All Comments