tablets

Borders Kobo eReader Wireless Tablet Review

The lightweight Borders Kobo eReader Wireless offers a crisp eInk screen that has an ink-like feel to it.

May 23, 2011
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Device & Specs

These two devices are about as similar as two competing eReaders come, sporting the same type of screen, similar battery life and wireless capability. Still, the Kindle offers a user interface that allows for more options in browsing, which is a big plus.

Screen

Both the screen of the Kobo eReader Wireless and the Kindle WiFi are 800x600 eInk displays that not only carry a similar DPI but also a similar contrast ratio. There isn't much difference between the two here.

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Battery

Both Borders and Amazon claim to have incredible battery life with each unit, and they do... with the WiFi options turned off. Once you've done that, both the Kobo eReader Wireless and the Kindle WiFi will last you for days on end if you're reading eBooks.

eReader

The experience is quite a bit different between the Kobo eReader Wireless and the Kindle WiFi, as different interface options make certain things easier or more difficult, depending on what they are. For example, the Kindle WiFi has a full keyboard, which allows for easy searches, dictionary lookup and web browsing. The Kobo eReader Wireless does not have this, so all of those features are either omitted or extremely difficult to navigate with only a small d-pad to interface with your eReader. That being said, the page turn buttons are easier to reach on the Kobo eReader Wireless if you're right-handed.

Internet

The Kindle WiFi has quite a leg up on the Kobo eReader Wireless in terms of web content, as you can browse the web (albeit with a poor browser), but beyond this feature, both tablets are pretty much limited to browsing their proprietary eBook stores with a WiFi connection, though the Kindle WiFi also has a model capable of using a 3G connection (no service fees required) to access it. Truth be told, these eReaders really weren't meant to do much with the internet beyond buy books, and their functionality in this regard reflects that.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  7. Amazon Kindle Keyboard Wi-Fi Comparison
  8. Barnes & Noble Nook Wi-Fi Comparison
  9. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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