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Google Nexus 7 Review

After months of rumors, speculation, and nerd rage, the Nexus 7 is finally here.

July 17, 2012
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Science Introduction

Sure, you don't expect a lot when you don't pay a lot, but the Nexus7 is the exact opposite: Google crammed it with everything but the kitchen sink.

Screen Performance

Pixel dense, and with the best color performance of any Android tablet.

Google gave its Nexus7 a 6 x 3.75-inch display with a resolution of 1280 x 800, netting it a pixel density of 213 PPI (pixels per inch), which is better than the last generation of tablets, but not quite a "retina" display. However, the Google Nexus 7 has the best color gamut of all Android devices tested to date by a huge margin. While it does have the usual shifting of blues and reds, the color error is much, much lower than it is on 99% of all other Android tablets. If you're looking for an Android tablet with the best screen, here it is.

Even though the peak brightness of 340.8 cd/m2 isn’t all that fantastic, it should be bright enough for most home use. Coupled with the fact that it has a black level of 0.42 cd/m2, the Google Nexus7 has a fairly good contrast ratio (811:1) in comparison to most tablets, meaning there should be a fair amount of detail preserved in different lighting environments in your media.

Like most tablets with an LCD screen, the Google Nexus 7 is highly reflective. Sending back 11.65% of all light back at the user, the Google Nexus 7 doesn't reflect as much light as other tablets, but the ill effects of bright light are worsened by a sharp reflection pattern, and the tablet's average peak brightness.

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Battery Life

Holy moly! This is a fantastic battery.

We apologize for taking so long with the battery tests, but it happened that way because it takes a really long time for the battery to discharge even at full brightness. In our tests, the Google Nexus 7 was able to last 11 hours and 8 minutes playing a video on repeat, and it was able to read War and Peace for 8 hours, 15 minutes before dying.

As usual, we tested the tablet with all wireless turned off and the backlight cranked, so your mileage will probably vary if you keep Wi-Fi on, tether a device, or lower your backlight. However, should your battery run out, you'll be able to get a charge on there in no time, so it's not something catastrophic to worry about.

Other Tests

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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