tablets

Google Nexus 10 Review

The Nexus 10 has loads of features, but uses a screen that could benefit from a little more testing.

November 16, 2012
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Science Introduction

The Nexus10 has loads of impressive stats, but uses a screen that, while amazing in some areas, is terrible in others.

Screen Performance

Super high resolution, but very uninspiring performance.

Despite the Google Nexus 10's high peak brightness of 432.48 cd/m2 the contrast ratio of the tablet is cut short by the bright black level of 0.64 cd/m2. A wide contrast ratio (anything above 1000:1) is important in order to display a large number of values in greyscale for picture detail, but when it's narrow (for example, the Nexus10's 686:1 ratio), your picture will look washed out.

The Nexus10's color performance is bad, especially when you consider just how far other displays have come in the last year, including the Nexus7. While the white point is just about where it should be, none of the reds, greens, or blues are in a good spot. Reds and greens are undersaturated, meaning the deepest values of each are not as intense as they should be, and blues are shifted wildly to a more cyan-ish color.

By cramming in 2560 x 1600 pixels into a display that occupies 8.5625 x 5.375 inches of real estate, the Google Nexus 10 has a pixel density of 299 PPI (pixels per inch), which is very impressive for its size. What does this mean for you? Well, in addition to being able to view high-resolution media on a large screen with no visible pixel lines, you'll have one of the most crisp screen images available to tablet owners. Though it's an uncommon feature, the Nexus10 actually has an anti-reflective coating that does a fairly good job at dispelling annoying reflection patterns from your screen. Only reflecting 3.8% of ambient light back at the user, the Nexus10's screen is friendly to a wide array of lighting conditions.

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Battery Life

Not a bad battery, but it spends a lot of its juice pixel-pushing.

After subjecting the Google Nexus 10 to a series of battery tests, we've concluded that it does a fairly good job of maintaining a charge, though the screen is a bit of a power hog. In our labs, the Nexus10 was able to read War and Peace for 6 hours, 39 minutes, and it was able to play one of the worst movies of all time for 5 hours, 57 minutes. Because we perform these tests at full backlight and all wireless/extra processes disabled, your mileage may vary in terms of battery life, and in fact we experienced this for ourselves.

There are many strategies you can use to increase your battery life, like turning down the backlight, but one of the many different capabilities that you earn by buying a Nexus device is the ability to root it and install your own ROM on there. Some of these have been purported to use less juice for basic tasks, but of course, doing this comes with its own risks. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you should probably not venture out into the world of hacking your tablet until you learn a bit more.

Other Tests

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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