tablets

Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet Review

Frequent crashes and severe battery drain make the ThinkPad Tablet a less than ideal purchase.

February 03, 2012
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Screen

The Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet is built around an 8.625 x 5.325 inch IPS LED backlit LCD displaym with a resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels. Aside from the IPS screen, this is about par for the course as far as tablets in this price range go. The IPS screen enables users to have a fairly wide viewing angle, but there's only a very small chance that this would become a big deal unless you were showing your friends something on the screen.

Front Image

Indoor & Outdoor Use

LIke most tablets with an LCD screen, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet does not fare so well outdoors. Because LCD screens require a backlight to make their image seen, direct sunlight often drowns out the light emitted by the tablet itself, resulting in a picture that is difficult to see at best (especially considering the high reflectivity). Tablets with LCD screens typically disappoint here, and the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet is no different.

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NOTE: The images above are shot with a variety of lighting sources, which may cause some color shift.

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Legibility

The Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet produces a crisp, legible picture much like any other tablet with its resolution, even if its animations are a little stuttery. Below you can see for yourself, using our incredibly nitpicky use of a microscope to show you how your image will look.

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There’s only very minimal “stair-stepping” indicative of resolution problems, but very little that you’ll find distracting. Overall a good score here.

Reflectance

Similarly, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet does nothing to set itself apart from other LCD-screened tablets, as it has an extremely reflective screen. Though it has a high peak brightness to combat the intensity of direct sunlight, the reflectiveness pattern is incredibly distracting and annoying, so do what you can to avoid direct light on the screen.

Screen Size & DPI

With the commonplace screen size of 10.1 inches and the equally commonplace resolution of 1280 × 800 pixels, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet, you should not want for a bigger screen. The resolution also nets the ThinkPad Tablet a DPI (dots per inch) of 149, while not the best in the world, is not too far behind what other tablets in its price range and size give us.

Blacks and Whites

Tablets typically fall short of competing with TVs in terms of contrast performance, but the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet falls very short by virtue of its disappointingly high black level. If you’re wondering why a high black level is bad, know that a low black level is important for a high contrast ratio, and more accurate lighting in your pictures and movies. Because the deepest black it can produce is 0.6 cd/m2, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet’s contrast ratio is severely narrowed, even though it has a very high peak brightness.

Color Gamut

Like most tablets, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet disappoints in color gamut, with significant color error when matched up against the rec. 709 standard. Most notably, it shifts blues to a more cyan-insh color.

Science Section 2 Images

Battery Life

When Lenovo shipped its flagship tablet, it did not include a very good battery. Providing users with just over 5 hours of video playback or eBook reading, the battery is firmly in the “bad” category for tablets. Perhaps it’s due to the big screen, but for whatever reason, this tablet will leave you high and dry on long trips.

Science Section 1 Images
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Movies & Video
  8. Email & Web Browsing
  9. Internet Apps
  10. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  11. Asus Transformer Comparison
  12. Amazon Kindle Fire Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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