tablets

Motorola Xyboard Tablet Review

For those of you looking for a media powerhouse, this tablet has the most features we've seen in a long while.

February 15, 2012
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Controls

The controls for the Motorola Xyboard are accessed almost exclusively from the capacitive touch screen, but there are a couple physical buttons on the back that you should be aware of. For starters, the power/sleep/wake button is on the back of the right side (if held at a landscape orientation), and right next to it is the physical volume controls. Though some may lament the loss of physical buttons, it's more of a taste thing, as there are very few tablets that we've seen with physical buttons that enhance the experience by a large degree.

As you may have guessed already, there are other controls we should discuss as well. The "dijit" application allows you to remotely control pretty much any device that can be controlled by infrared. Once you've chosen your brand of device (TV, cable box, etc.), it will automatically load a command profile, and you can control your set with your tablet's touchscreen. Very cool.

Connectivity

This is the point in the review where we tell you that the Motorola Xyboard has some fairly great connectivity options, many of which are seen on other tablets, but that doesn't make them any less useful. If you want a tablet that can not only interface with your computer and TV, you'd probably be delighted to know that the Motorola Xyboard has a microHDMI output port, as well as several apps to handle things like streaming and remote office applications. On top of all that, Motorola joins Sony and Vizio in the universal remote application club with an IR-blaster to directly control your devices at home with an included application.

As with most tablets, the Motorola Xyboard has an onboard 802.11n wireless card, and there are other iterations of the device that are 4G enabled available if you also pay for a data plan. Also available is the ability to make use of bluetooth 2.1+ EDR, allowing you to tether accessories to your tablet. On top of all that, the Motorola Xyboard has an aGPS unit that runs with the Google suite of navigation software, including maps, navigation, and streetview.

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Battery Life

Considering that Motorola's Xoom tablet is the former champion of battery life on TRI, it was a little baffling to get the results back on the Xyboard and see that it lost well over an hour on both the eBook reading and the video battery life. With eBook reading clocking in at 6 hours, 9 minutes, and video playback at 5 hours, 37 minutes, the Xyboard is a huge dropoff in comparison to the Xoom's battery life.

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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Introduction
  2. Product Tour
  3. Screen
  4. Battery & Controls
  5. eReader
  6. Music & Audio
  7. Movies & Video
  8. Email & Web Browsing
  9. Internet Apps
  10. Apple iPad 2 Wi-fi & 3G / AT&T / 16 GB Comparison
  11. Motorola Xoom Comparison
  12. Amazon Kindle Fire Comparison
  13. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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